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Our Blog

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Our First Blog Entry

January 15, 2018

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February 14, 2018

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Creating a Chippy, Worn Paint Look

March 15, 2018

Oh but do I ever love a distressed, chippy, worn paint look! 


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I thought this antique wash stand would make a cool coffee cart (or whatever!). I envisioned farmhouse style and wanted to use Dixie Belle’s newest color, Farmhouse Green. 


Step 1: Boy was it dirty! I gave it a good scrubbing with Dixie Belle’s “White Lightning” cleaner. I did that on a Facebook Live session, so you can catch it here if you want.


Step 2: Because this piece is old and the original topcoat was worn off, there was a good chance of tannin bleed-through. (That’s when the wood “bleeds” through the paint and messes up your paint job.) To prevent that, I gave it one good coat of BOSS, which Blocks Odors Stains and Stops Bleed Through. I used the Clear, which dries almost invisible. Now the piece is ready for any colors.


I wanted the piece to have two different shades in the same hue so it would look a bit like the original paint had been worn down and faded.


Step 3: I mixed Dixie Belle’s new color, Farmhouse Green, with Fluff (a white). I don’t measure, but I’d say it was something like 80% Fluff, 20% Farmhouse Green. This was my base color. One solid coat gave it great coverage.


Step 4: Knowing I was going to put “straight” Farmhouse Green as the second coat, and wanting a lot of the base coat to show through, I applied Dixie Belle’s Best Dang Wax (in Clear) randomly and a bit thickly all over the piece. The wax creates “resistance”, meaning, after I lightly sand back the first coat of paint, the base coat will show through. I let the wax dry a few minutes before I painted the second color.


Step 5: Next up, I gave it a coat of Farmhouse Green. As soon as it’s dry (or even “almost dry”), immediately I moved to the next step. (Don’t let it dry more than an hour or so!)


Step 6: To encourage chippy goodness, I aimed a heat gun at the piece long enough to create some bubbling. When you sand away the bubbles, it creates the look.


I then let it dry well - a couple hours or so.


Step 7: I love this part. Enter the Black & Decker mouse sander. The pointy tip gives good control for distressing. I used an 80-grit sandpaper to give it a heavy dose of distressing. To reveal the base color, sand lightly in some parts, and sand heavier in others to get all the way to the wood. You can watch some of the distressing on video here.


Step 8: After dusting it off and letting it dry overnight, I applied some Dixie Belle Clear Coat in “Flat” (non-shiny) to the top. The paint is very durable, and since this is a super distressed look, I wasn’t worried about sealing the base. But I always seal the tops for extra durability.


This baby’s ready to rock a farmhouse or rustic style home!


What color combination would you like to use this technique with? 

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